Indian men fail to qualify for Rio Olympics

The top-seeded Indian side, comprising Mangal Singh Champia, Atanu Das and Jayanta Talukdar, defeated host Turkey 5-4 (26-24) in the first round but faltered in the next round against eighth-seeded Malaysia.

Jayanta Talukdar (in picture) and his team-mates were knocked out in the second round despite leading 4-2 at one stage.   -  R.V. Moorthy

The Indian men’s archery team failed to make the cut for the Rio Games after losing to Malaysia in a shoot-off in the quaterfinals of the final Olympic qualifying tournament in Antalya, Turkey, on Thursday.

The top-seeded Indian side, comprising Mangal Singh Champia, Atanu Das and Jayanta Talukdar, defeated host Turkey 5-4 (26-24) in the first round but faltered in the next round against eighth-seeded Malaysia 4-5 (27-28). India, which was leading 4-2 at one stage, allowed Malaysia to draw parity and make it 4-4. In the shoot-off, the Malaysians held their nerve to reach the semifinals.

Malaysia, which lost to Indonesia 0-6 in the last four, beat Germany 6-2 in the bronze medal match to claim a team spot in Rio. Gold and silver medallists Indonesia and France were the other sides to make it to the Olympics from this event. India has bagged one individual slot in the men’s section for which the Archery Association of India will conduct a trial to pick an archer.

The Indian women’s team, consisting of three members, has already qualified for the Olympics. Meanwhile, in the archery World Cup being held simultaneously at the same venue, Atanu Das lost in the semifinals to Bonchan Ku of South Korea 0-6 and would meet another Korean Woojin Kim in the bronze medal match of the men's recurve individual competition.

Indian women’s recurve and compound teams will also play their bronze medal matches against Italy and Indonesia respectively.

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