Coe asks federations to align with IAAF's integrity unit

The IAAF president is keen to clean up athletics and felt that national federations could pass on local intelligence to the world body’s Athletics Integrity Unit set up last year.

IAAF president, Sebastian Coe is currently in Jakarta for the Asian Games.   -  Stan Rayan

India may not be on the world athletics body IAAF’s doping watchlist but life could be tough for athletes who are taking illegal roads to fame.

Sebastian Coe, the IAAF president, is keen to clean up athletics and felt that national federations could pass on local intelligence to the world body’s Athletics Integrity Unit set up last year.

“You have some federations on the watchlist. After Kenya, Ethiopia, Morocco and Belarus are on the watchlist. So, it’s very important that we all look at good federations that do a good job,” said Coe, the middle distance legend, in a chat with Sportstar here on Saturday.

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“But it is also very important that federations monitor what’s going on at the international level, what we are encouraging. And there are new responsibilities, an alignment which the AIU is what we are now discussing with the federations, how they can help as well. It’s important that they have local intelligence that we need to tap in as well.”

Coe, however, made it clear that India, despite some of its stars being untraceable for months, is not on the doping watchlist.

“We now have the AIU which has got investigative powers, it has got the ability to track down athletes, it has the ability to do independent testing, and much more effectively,” said Coe.

He said the IAAF would review events that come under the Difference of Sexual Development guidelines after many felt that South African Caster Semenya was the world body’s main target.

“Let me be really clear, this is not about individual athletes or federations. The IAAF Council have been chosen where we can show the biggest difference that is made in the overall performance,” said Coe.

“But we will review that and if other events seem to be affected in that same way, discussions may take place.”

There had been issues recently with companies holding television rights not offering live telecast of major athletics events in India. Even live streaming was blocked.

“We need to be tough with our broadcasters, when broadcasters strike a deal we need to remember that live-streaming should also be done,” said the IAAF chief.

“When you have your best athletes competing, the bulk of your population, if they choose to, will have the opportunity to see them.”