Sindhu: Going for Glasgow gold

“There is no difference among the top 20 shuttlers and it all boils down to who plays a better game on the given day. One has to stay focused to keep winning. That’s what I am really trying to do and come back with a World championship medal — preferably a gold,” says P. V. Sindhu.

"Definitely, I have changed a bit of my game to be more consistent and successful of late," says Sindhu.   -  Getty Images

The body language clearly suggests that Pusarla Venkata Sindhu is on a mission — to win a gold in the World Championship in Glasgow — even while she says it is not going to be easy.

“What happened in the past is something to be left behind. Reputations or medals in Olympics don’t matter. It is a fresh edition and the challenges need to be faced on a different level,” starts off Sindhu in an exclusive interview to Sportstar after another long training schedule at the Pullela Gopi Chand Academy in Hyderabad.

The winner of two World championship bronze medals even before she bagged the silver in the Rio Olympics, Sindhu reminds us that she has been really focused on a lot of aspects of her game to be a complete player. “Or else, you will be left behind in this highly demanding and competitive circuit,” she says.

And interestingly, her father P. V. Ramana’s advice to Sindhu has been pretty simple ... ‘listen to anyone who spots any flaws or even comes up with a suggestion about your game.’ 

“You just try out those things and see if you have become a better player, but always be a willing learner,” he tells her. And the disciplined girl that she is, Sindhu has her feet firmly on the ground as she prepares for another go in the Worlds.

“In fact, most of the big names will be starting off their international campaign in the World championship after a break of a few weeks and so will be fresh and rejuvenated for the bigger challenges,” she says.

“There is no difference among the top 20 shuttlers and it all boils down to who plays a better game on the given day. One has to stay focused to keep winning. That’s what I am really trying to do and come back with a World championship medal — preferably a gold,” she says with a hearty laugh.

“Earlier, I was a little impatient and went for the strokes too early, but now have learnt the art of tiring out the opponent with an all-court game. I have realised the need to control myself and my game at critical junctures to get the better of the opponent. Definitely, I have changed a bit of my game to be more consistent and successful of late,” she says.

“A lot of credit for this goes to the Indonesian coaches, especially Mulyo (Handoyo). The training sessions are now very long and in fact everyone is enjoying them. And if you look at the results in our men’s singles, the change is there for everyone to see,” she says.

What is the target now? “Win a world championship gold and scale the summit,” she says.