Sindhu: ‘It is better to get cured than continue playing’

Recovering from a hamstring injury and starting serious training for the last couple of days, the 21-year-old P. V. Sindhu felt that All England title is one thing which she would love to win.

Sindhu recalled that the six-month phase before the Rio Olympics was the most difficult one because of a navicular stress fracture.   -  V. RAJU

Rio Olympics silver medallist, P.V. Sindhu, has now set her eyes on the prestigious All England championship starting in the first week of April.

Recovering from a hamstring injury and starting serious training for the last couple of days, the 21-year-old Sindhu felt that All England title is one thing which she would love to win.

For someone who had won two World Championship bronze medals and the Olympics silver besides winning some of the major Super Series title, Sindhu feels that the aura of All England is something different and where many players dream off to be champions.

Speaking on the sidelines of a seminar on sports medicine of Yasodha Hospital here on Sunday, Sindhu reminded that she was back to serious training only a few days ago after the rest advised by Dr. Nithin Kumar of Yasodha Hospital.

Training under the watchful guidance of her mentor and chief national coach, Pullela Gopi Chand as the latter’s Academy, Sindhu recalled that the six-month phase before the Rio Olympics was the most difficult one because of a navicular stress fracture.

“Injuries just come like that. They don’t tell you they are coming,” Sindhu quipped. “And, I know what kind of a difficult phase it was before the Rio Games because the confidence was low as any rest meant you had to be away from the playing arena.”

“Injuries just come like that. They don’t tell you they are coming,” Sindhu quipped. “And, I know what kind of a difficult phase it was before the Rio Games because the confidence was low as any rest meant you had to be away from the playing arena,” she recalled.

“Yes, getting injured is one thing and diagnosed correctly and put in a rehab programme is another huge thing. But, I am fortunate to have the right guidance through those moments,” Sindhu pointed out.

“As a player you often tend to be enthusiastic to play, neglecting the pain. But again, it is then a qualified doctor’s advice helps you. With regard to my latest hamstring, I was advised not to play in a tournament for rest was more important than playing in an event and aggravating it further,” the champion shuttler explained.

“I sincerely appeal to all my fellow athletes to be more serious when handling the injury phase. Rest and rehab are the most critical factors for speedy recovery,” Sindhu advised.

“Yes, I reiterate rest is always uncomfortable for any athlete. But it is inevitable when any athlete meets any injury. It is better to get cured than continue playing with an injury and force upon yourself a major surgery which might be career-threatening one too,” she cautioned.