Report: NBA, players agree on jersey messages

NBA players were involved in nationwide protests, vocal on social media and active in the aftermath of George Floyd's death on May 25.

The NBA announced on Friday Chicago's United Center will host the 2020 NBA All-Star Game.   -  Getty Images (Representative Image)

The NBA and the National Basketball Players Association agreed on which social justice messages players can wear on the back of their jerseys when the season starts again later this month, ESPN's The Undefeated reported on Friday.

The list of acceptable phrases was distributed to the players, who can replace their last names on their jerseys with one of the approved messages. If they initially pass on selecting a choice and change their mind after the first four nights of the season's restart, the message will be added above their name, according to the report.

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The coronavirus pandemic interrupted the season on March 11, and the NBA plans to resume play on July 30, with all games played in the Orlando area.

Players have been active in social justice issues since the death of George Floyd, a Black man, at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis in May. The league and the union agreed last month to include several initiatives to fight systemic racism in the restarted season.

The Undefeated report revealed a list of 29 acceptable messages for the jerseys. They include Black Lives Matter -- which will be painted on all courts -- Say Their Names, I Can't Breathe, Enough, Power to the People, Justice Now and How Many More.

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Names of Floyd and others who have passed away in police custody or under circumstances invoking racism will not be used.

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