Mayweather vs Pacquiao five years on: Floyd's top 10 wins

Five years ago, Floyd Mayweather cemented his status as the finest boxer of his generation by beating Manny Pacquiao. Was it his best win?

Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao.   -  Getty Images

After more than half a decade of wait, baiting, claim and counter-claim, the boxing world finally got the fight it desired on May 2, 2015 when Floyd Mayweather Jr and Manny Pacquiao met in Las Vegas.

Pacquiao was unable to stain his fellow great's immaculate professional record as Mayweather did what late-career Mayweather always did: assessed the puzzle, solved the puzzle and banked rounds, all the while caring little about perceptions of how entertaining he was.

After Pacquiao, there was nothing left to prove or achieve for Mayweather, as evidenced by his final two bouts against Andre Berto and Conor McGregor – outings that were respectively pointless and farcical.

Questions will always linger of what might have happened had Pacquiao met Mayweather somewhere closer to his 2009-10 zenith, but there can be little doubt that 'Money' settled the argument over who the outstanding fighter of the 21st century to date is.

So, where does that blockbusting win rank among his best victories?

10. ZAB JUDAH (APRIL 2006, 12 UD)

Mayweather's bid to become a four-weight world champion at welterweight got off to a rocky start against fellow brash-talking American Judah, with a right hook in the second forcing him to touch down. No knockdown was called and Mayweather assumed typically smooth control thereafter. Judah's frustrations boiled over in round 10 with a low blow that sparked an in-ring melee featuring Floyd's uncle Roger Mayweather and Judah's father Yoel.

9. JESUS CHAVEZ (NOVEMBER 2001, 9 RTD)

At odds with his latter run in the 147lb and 154lb divisions, Mayweather's outings in the lighter weights were often all-action affairs. This barnstormer against Chavez was a case in point, with his formidable Mexican foe maniacally throwing 925 punches in pursuit of the WBC super-featherweight title. Mayweather landed 197 of 456 and that greater efficiency persuaded Chavez's trainer Ronnie Shields to end the fight after round nine, telling his man: "You're getting hit too much now."

8. SHANE MOSLEY (MAY 2010, 12 UD)

Never did Mayweather look closer to defeat than in a torrid second round against bitter rival Mosley, wearing two huge right hands. The second of those saw his knees buckle but he stayed upright and won every remaining round on two of the three judges' scorecards.

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7. JOSE LUIS CASTILLO (DECEMBER 2002, 12 UD)

The biggest question mark against Mayweather's unbeaten record is his initial fight with Mexican pressure fighter Castillo, with the WBC lightweight champion's unanimous verdict on the scorecards a controversial outcome for many. The scores were actually closer on paper second time around but Mayweather came through another stern examination impressively. "I never figured him out," Castillo conceded afterwards. "I think he fought a more intelligent fight this time. I never felt I did anything this time."

6. RICKY HATTON (DECEMBER 2007, 10 TKO)

Someone's 0 had to go in Las Vegas and it was Hatton's barmy army of Brits who left the MGM Grand Garden Arena disappointed if suitably refreshed as Mayweather surgically took apart the Mancunian hero in this mega fight. A straight Hatton right had the WBC welterweight champion staggering backwards in round one but the writing had long been on the wall by the time Mayweather drilled his man into the ringpost before a second knockdown of round 10 closed the show.

5. SAUL 'CANELO' ALVAREZ (SEPTEMBER 2013, 12 MD)

Another criticism of Mayweather was a tendency to stack the deck unnecessarily high in his favour, with the demand for Alvarez to shave an additional two pounds off his thick-set frame for this WBC light-middleweight showdown a prime example. Regardless, this was a sublime showing as the master put on a boxing clinic for the apprentice. C. J. Ross' 114-114 scorecard was as baffling and unnecessary as Mayweather's vast supercar collection.

4. OSCAR DE LA HOYA (MAY 2007, 12 SD)

Setting the template for his late-career run, Mayweather frustrated the more aggressive De La Hoya to pot shot his way to a points win and become a five-weight world champion. He collected the WBC light-middleweight belt in a bout that, at the time, was the richest in boxing history. A baton was passed in terms of who was American's pay-per-view superstar – it was the night 'Pretty Boy Floyd' became 'Money'.

3. MIGUEL COTTO (MAY 2012, 12 UD)

The eventual wide points totals of 117-111 twice and 116-112 do not do justice to Cotto's contribution to a lesser-spotted thriller in the autumn of Mayweather's career. Defending his WBA 154lb title and with the vacant WBC strap on the line, the Puerto Rican great bloodied his opponent's nose and caused plenty of headaches with his intelligent pressure. There was more than enough coming back the other way for Mayweather to deserve his triumph, but Cotto made him work like few others.

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2. MANNY PACQUIAO (MAY 2015, 12 UD)

Yes, the thrills that might have prevailed five years earlier were sadly absent. The reduction in Pacquiao's buzz saw output was the main factor here, with a rotator cuff injury perhaps key in the surprising fact Mayweather both out threw and out landed 'Pacman'. Still, failing to face and overcome an eight-weight champion who continues to rule at welterweight today, despite being 41, was never an option for Mayweather and his claims to greatness. It was the biggest night of his career and, typically, he made it look easy.

1. DIEGO CORRALES (JANUARY 2001, 10 TKO)

A masterclass and, arguably, Mayweather's masterpiece. All the elements – immaculate footwork, quicksilver hands, impeccable defence – were there against an all-action opponent, who went into the bout with a 33-0 record. Typically, Corrales never stopped coming forward, although the diet of crisp left hooks he swallowed underlined the futility of his endeavours. That honey punch was key as Mayweather decked his man three times in round seven and twice more in 10 to retain the WBC super-featherweight title.

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