CoA member Edulji welcomes new SC directive

Edulji agreed that it is better to have ‘continuity’when it came to running the matters within the BCCI.

“It is their (Supreme Court’s) wisdom if they felt this way, I don’t have any problems in that. I will be there to implement this order also,” the former India women's team captain, said.   -  afp

As the Supreme Court, on Thursday, decided to do away with the imposition of a cooling-off period for cricket administrators between two terms,  Committee of Administrators (CoA) member, Diana Edulji, welcomed the move.

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The original Lodha reforms had suggested only one term of three years before the mandatory cooling-off period, but the new order allows office-bearers to have two consecutive terms before the mandatory cooling off.

This also means that acting secretary, Amitabh Choudhary, and acting treasurer, Anirudh Chaudhry, can contest for another term.

Edulji also agreed that it is better to have ‘continuity’. “To be frank, I may have my personal views. But continuity is good. Even the US President has two terms, so there is no harm in that. But I must see the fine print first,” Edulji told Sportstar.

“It is their (Supreme Court’s) wisdom if they felt this way, I don’t have any problems in that. I will be there to implement this order also,” the former India women's team captain, said.

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She, however, admitted that the CoA is yet to receive the orders completely. “We were brought in by the Supreme Court to implement the previous orders, then there were some upheavals that were going on. Now the Supreme Court has clarified all these things and has given us a new constitution,” she added.

While she made it clear that it would not be possible to ‘go into the details’ without seeing the entire order, Edulji admitted that one should accept the new order for the sake of the sport. “This is in the interest of Indian cricket. We should accept it and move on."

Members should comply '100 per cent' with the alterations and make necessary changes in their respective Constitutions within 30 days, thus clearing the way for the Board’s elections; failing to do so could lead to action from the court.

The court has already warned the state units to either fall in line or face action. “As a true servant of the court, I will do whatever is required to implement the new order,” Edulji said.