Let Dhoni take a call on his retirement, says Shukla

M. S. Dhoni took a break from the game after India's exit in the semifinals of the 2019 World Cup. He is set to be back in action in the IPL starting March 23.

There is a lot of speculation over Dhoni's retirement from limited overs formats of the game.   -  Getty Images

Former Indian Premier League chairman Rajiv Shukla on Friday said ex-India skipper M. S. Dhoni has a lot of cricketing career left and only he can decide when to hang up his boots.

Shukla said the Board of Control for Cricket in India has a policy in place that allows a player to decide when to call it a day.

"Dhoni is a great cricketer and there is a lot more cricket left in him. But, he has to decide when he should take retirement," Shukla told reporters here.

The 38-year-old wicketkeeper-batsman retired from Test cricket in 2014.

There is a lot of speculation over the retirement of the two-time World Cup winning India captain from limited overs formats of the game.

RELATED | Dhoni visits Puttaparthi ahead of IPL  

The popular cricketer from Jharkhand took a break from the game after India's exit in the semifinals of the 2019 50-over World Cup in England. He is set to be back in action in the IPL, where he will lead the Chennai Super Kings, starting March 23.

Asked about workload management of cricketers, Shukla said fixtures for two international series should be charted out in such a way that players get proper time to rest in between.

Over the extradition of alleged bookie Sanjeev Chawla from London recently, he said, "The police are investigating the case against him and law will take its own course."

A Delhi court on Thursday put Chawla, a key accused in one of the crickets biggest match-fixing scandals that involved former South Africa captain Hanse Cronje, in a 12-day police custody.

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