PCB is not going to appeal: Mani on compensation decision

After being asked by ICC to pay 60 per cent as compensation cost to BCCI, the PCB has decided not to appeal against the decision.

The PCB chief said he is disappointed with the decision and will move on.   -  AFP

After the International Cricket Council (ICC)’s Dispute Resolution Panel ordered Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) to pay 60 per cent of the cost demanded by the BCCI following the world body’s rejection of the PCB’s compensation claim which blamed India for lack of bilateral series between the two nations, PCB has decided to ‘move on’.

Speaking to Sportstar on Thursday, PCB chief, Ehsan Mani, confirmed that the Board will not appeal against the decision. “We are very disappointed with the outcome, but we are not going to appeal against the decision. We will simply move on from here,” Mani said, making it clear that “the time for appeal is already gone.”

While the PCB chief is disappointed with the whole episode and has taken the verdict with a pinch of salt. “It’s a formula ICC has come out with, which also shows that even the other members were not 100 per cent convinced with the BCCI case, or else they would have asked for the 100 per cent cost from the PCB. They discounted it by 40 per cent,” Mani said.

Nearly a month after rejecting the PCB’s compensation claim against India for allegedly failing to honour a Memorandum of Understanding on bilateral cricket, the ICC announced the costs award for the two Boards. While PCB needs to pay approximately $2 million, BCCI has to bear the rest 40 per cent as administrative fees to the panel.

The whole issue started after India refused to play any bilateral cricket with Pakistan as a result of political tension and lack of government clearance despite the MoU being signed.

Now with the decision going against it, does the PCB regret the decision?

“It is always better to have dealt it (things) by dialogues, but it is disappointing that BCCI initially committed to play against Pakistan and then ignored their own commitment.

"But what has happened has happened, we need to move forward rather than looking back,” Mani said.