Comedy of errors rule Day One

India’s poor form in taking reviews continues to haunt the team. On the first day of the third Test in Ranchi, India’s stand-in captain Ajinkya Rahane made a brave decision to challenge the on-field umpire’s call when Glenn Maxwell was allowed to stay at the crease after an LBW appeal off Ishant Sharma.

Wriddhiman appeals for a catch as Australian skipper Steven Smith looks amazed in Ranchi on Thursday.   -  PTI

India’s poor form in taking reviews continues to haunt the team. On the first day of the third Test in Ranchi, India’s stand-in captain Ajinkya Rahane made a brave decision to challenge the on-field umpire’s call when Glenn Maxwell was allowed to stay at the crease after an LBW appeal off Ishant Sharma.

The call, however, was rejected as the replays showed that Sharma had actually bowled a no-ball. Later in the day, the Hawkeye revealed that the ball would have clipped the outside of the leg stump. So officially, Maxwell could be in peace!

Day One in Pictures

As the no-ball incident came out in the open, the television commentators and former cricketers like Sanjay Manjrekar and Matthew Hayden said that since the umpire failed to call it a no-ball, India should not be losing a review.

Smith, Maxwell help Australia finish strong on Day One

Later, it was learnt that India did not lose a review, as a new rule change indicates that the fielding side will not lose a review if the umpire is at fault. In November last year, this rule did not exist and as a result, South Africa had lost a review against Australia after quick Vernon Philander bowled a no-ball.

When Saha knocked Smith down

While the rule change created a bit of confusion in the day’s proceedings, there was no humour lost on the field. And, the Indian team must thank its wicketkeeper Wriddhiman Saha for tickling the funny bones.

Australia skipper Steven Smith missed a ball that got stuck between his legs, and Saha tried to snatch the ball from the delicate spot, knocking the batsman to the ground. Saha then held up the ball to appeal for a catch. Umpire Ian Gould, quite naturally, was not convinced, and walked away laughing. It was declared as a dead ball.

While the Indian players were laughing away, Smith looked all serious, perhaps still trying to come to terms with the fact that Saha could actually do something like that!