Warner delighted to join exclusive Test club

Opener Warner scored 100 off just 78 deliveries in the first session of the third Test against Pakistan in Sydney, securing a place in history after becoming the fifth man to score a century before lunch. Apart from Warner, other players to achieve this feat are Victor Trumper, Charlie Macartney, Don Bradman and Majid Khan.

DavidWarner - cropped

David Warner celebrates after scoring his century against Pakistan during the third test in Sydney on Tuesday.

Australian batsman David Warner feels honoured to have secured a place in history after becoming the fifth man to score a century before lunch on the first day of a Test.

Opener Warner scored 100 off just 78 deliveries in the first session of the third Test against Pakistan in Sydney, matching a feat only achieved by Victor Trumper, Charlie Macartney, Don Bradman and Majid Khan.

On the back of his Boxing Day hundred, Warner became the first player to achieve the milestone on Australian soil and he was delighted to have earned a place alongside such esteemed company.

"It's an honour to be alongside those names," said Warner. I had absolutely no idea about that stat. I knew about hundreds in a session, but not that stat at all. I started last year with a hundred here and I've done it again and I've got to capitalise on that.

"It's rewarding as an individual, but this is a team sport and I was happy to get the guys off to a great start."

Warner was dismissed by Wahab Riaz on 113, but 20-year-old Matt Renshaw batted through the day and reached stumps with a score of 167 not out. While Warner was fast racking up the runs, Renshaw reached the break on 25 after a much more serene knock prior to lunch.

"That first session was all just a bit of a whirlwind," Renshaw said. "Davey was absolutely smoking them and I was just trudging along on not many.

"I was trying not to keep up with him, like I have done in the past apparently. He keeps telling me that I'm not going to keep up with him too much and I didn't try at all."

There was cause for concern when a Mohammed Amir delivery bounced up and struck the grill of Renshaw's helmet when he was on 91. However, after passing tests conducted by doctor Peter Brunker, he returned to the action.

"He asked me if I was okay. I was fine, so I just wanted to be out there. I didn't want to retire hurt on 91," said Renshaw. "He asked me the score, and who the last person out was, but I got them pretty right. I think I was four runs off the score, so not too bad."