Anirban Lahiri seeks to make amends at Canadian Open

The Indian missed the cut at The Open last week.

Anirban Lahiri feels his game is in the right place and it is just a matter of putting together four rounds.   -  Getty Images

India’s Anirban Lahiri will look to shrug off the disappointment of missing the cut at The Open last week when he tees up at the RBC Canadian Open golf tournament here on Thursday.

The 30-year-old Indian, who has looked good in some rounds, but seldom for the whole week this season, has often seemed to be on threshold of a breakthrough win on the PGA Tour. Lahiri, who played well but just could not get to understand the greens, consistently missing makeable putters, many of them inside 10 feet, feels his game is in the right place and it is just a matter of putting together four rounds.

Already assured of a start in the FedEX Cup playoffs, where he is ranked 52nd, Lahiri is looking at going deep into the playoffs. And he does have the game to do that. This season, Lahiri was second at the Memorial and late last year when the wrap-around season began he was tied-third at the CIMB Classic.

The field has World No. 1 Dustin Johnson, who had a disappointing final round at the Open, while Matt Kuchar, who lost to the magical Jordan Spieth at Birkdale, will try to redeem himself. He is coming off some great results which are tied-ninth, tied-seventh, tied-fourth and tied-second in his last four starts. Johnson has had two missed cuts and a tied-54th in his last three starts.

Also looking to make up for the Open is Ian Poulter, who has been looking good for a win for sometime. The field also has Bubba Watson, who has fallen sharply to No. 46 in rankings and the defending champion, Jhonattan Vegas, who shot a final-round 8-under 64 to earn his second PGA Tour victory, last year. He won by one shot over Dustin Johnson, Martin Laird and Jon Rahm.

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