Cook: ‘Umpires are brave enough to give decisions’

Cook also said the best thing about the DRS is you talk about cricket, not about decisions that affect the game. "If there is a bad decision, it is overturned. Normally the best side wins rather than the umpiring howlers that become the big story."

England captain Alistair Cook said the DRS makes the batsman use his bat not his pads as a line of defence.   -  K.R. Deepak

An important feature of the five-Test series starting here on Wednesday would be the use of the Decision Review System (DRS), which the BCCI had rejected for several years. India’s captain Virat Kohli and coach Anil Kumble, who is also the Chairman of the ICC Cricket Committee, have played their part in getting it for a series in India for the first time.

England captain Alistair Cook said the DRS makes the batsman use his bat not his pads as a line of defence. “You have seen it over the last couple of years, the change DRS has done for playing spin. There’s a lot more balls hitting the stumps which is great for the game. You bring orthodox spinners back in the game. Gone are the days when you use pads. You have to use the bat. Umpires are now brave to give people out. Steve Smith’s one at Perth (against South Africa) was an example. Two years ago, it never even be considered given out.”

Cook also said the best thing about the DRS is you talk about cricket, not about decisions that affect the game. “If there is a bad decision, it is overturned. Normally the best side wins rather than the umpiring howlers that become the big story. Bangladesh was a prime example. Tough conditions were hard on players, but there were some wrong decisions. But both games, the best side won, we won the first Test, Bangladesh the second.”

Kohli said DRS is no rocket science. “As a cricketer you understand, you have a fair idea of where the ball has hit the pad, whether it has pitched in line or hit in line. Those are pretty basic things in cricket. You don't have to necessarily go through a course for DRS. I think we have observed enough watching on TV how DRS is used.

“It really depends on what the bowler and a wicketkeeper most importantly think about the particular event and if a referral (review) has to be made. It is pretty simple. It is nothing that we are focussing too much on. It just gives you another opportunity to check on a decision if you feel is not right. And I think that's pretty fair.”