Waugh receives Australian award for Indian orphanage work

Australian Test cricket captain Steve Waugh was named an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for his charity work at an Indian orphanage.

Australian Test cricket captain Steve Waugh was named an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for his charity work at an Indian orphanage.

REUTERS

"I don't see myself as being any different to anybody else," Waugh said after learning that he would receive the ceremonial honour in the government's Queen's Birthday honours list.

"It's only a sport and people do tend to forget that."

The 38-year-old Waugh has played in 160 Test matches, scoring 10,265 runs at an average of 49.83. He's scored more centuries (30) and played more Tests than any Australian and led his side to an unprecedented 16 consecutive Test victories.

Waugh's work in India is at the Udayan orphanage, which is a home for the children of leprosy sufferers.

"An opportunity was presented to me and I just wanted to see what these kids go through," said Waugh. "I realised with my profile I could make a difference and I wanted to become involved in it."

Waugh was one of five cricketers to be honoured.

West Indian Sir Garfield Sobers, who played for South Australia State from 1961-64, also received an AO while former Australian players Norm O'Neill and Peter Philpott, and administrators David Richards and John Mitchell, were awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM).