MotoGP Raceweek: Marquez criticises 'slow mode' Lorenzo after FP2 contact

Jorge Lorenzo blocked the racing line for Marc Marquez when the champion was on his flying final lap, causing some consternation.

MotoGP champion Marc Marquez.   -  Getty Images

Marc Marquez criticised Jorge Lorenzo for taking up the racing line in "slow mode" after the two made contact at the end of FP2 at the Australian Grand Prix on Friday.

The Repsol Honda teammates were close to crashing when Marquez made a final push to guarantee a top-10 spot in what is expected to be the only dry practice session and thus boost his chances of going straight into Q2.

Lorenzo hugged the inside of turn 11, forcing the newly crowned six-time MotoGP champion to take a wider line. The pair touched and one of the wings flew off Lorenzo's bike.

Marquez made a sleeping gesture to his fellow Spaniard when they stopped on the track at the end of the session and then shook his head. However, he assured there were no issues between the two.

The 26-year-old said: "Of course, in the first moment I was upset because now we cannot forget that free practice means qualifying practice, I mean you need to go directly into Qualifying 2 and the forecast for tomorrow looks like rain 100 per cent.

"So it was my last chance, I was on a very fast lap and I tried to overtake him in the best way for me to not lose time. But we need to pay attention, because we cannot ride in a slow mode in the middle of the line.

"Of course, he will say there was no space. But you need to check behind, you need to understand and be out of the racing line. Apart from that, I was angry at first, but then I was in his office and we speak together. No problem."

Lorenzo said: "Unfortunately, right at the end I didn't look back to see I had three or four riders behind me, I tried to be as far on the inside as possible but Marc and I were a little too close."

Marquez ended the day sixth fastest, with Lorenzo down in 16th, although the reigning champion was quickest in a tyre test session that saw him make a phenomenal save from a 70.8 degree lean angle.

Maverick Vinales posted the fastest free practice time of one minute and 28.824 seconds, 0.496 seconds quicker than Andrea Dovizioso who took second ahead of Cal Crutchlow.

Danilo Petrucci and home favourite Jack Miller with fourth and fifth respectively.

 

-  Quartararo ready to return to Australian GP action after FP1 crash -

Fabio Quartararo is ready to return to Australian Grand Prix action on Saturday after sitting out FP2 on Friday due to a crash in the opening session.

Petronas Yamaha rider Quartararo was taken to the medical centre at Phillip Island after a highside in FP1, with the painkillers he was administered forcing him to remain in the garage for the rest of the day.

X-rays revealed no fractures in his left leg, but the 2019 MotoGP Rookie of the Year will continue to receive treatment for a hematoma in his ankle and is subject to further assessment.

Quartararo posted a picture of himself on Twitter with the caption: "After this morning's crash, resting to swap the crutches for the M1 again tomorrow!"

In a statement on the MotoGP website, medical director Angel Charte said: "We submitted [Quartararo] to an exhaustive medical examination on the left ankle area, which is what he complained about most, and the footage looked like where he had the impact in quite a violent way.

"The conventional X-rays don't show any fracture to neither the tibia, nor the fibula or to the bones of the left foot. It's true that he has a big hematoma and bruising on the top of the foot and we've given him anti-inflammatories as well as cryotherapy and a more intensive treatment to bring down the pain.

"The rider is fit but we're going to monitor him day-to-day or hour-to-hour to see if it's recommendable that he goes out to ride or not."

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