Baseball jerseys being turned into hospital gowns, masks

MLB and official apparel maker Fanatics are absorbing all costs associated with converting machinery for production of up to one million masks and gowns.

An aerial view of Guaranteed Rate Field, home of the Chicago White Sox.

An aerial view of Guaranteed Rate Field, home of the Chicago White Sox.   -  Getty Images

Major League Baseball (MLB) jersey fabric from all teams, which are not already converted into uniforms, will be made into new apparel for hospital workers and emergency personnel to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

MLB and official apparel maker Fanatics are absorbing all costs associated with converting machinery at the Easton, Pennsylvania, factory for production of up to one million masks and gowns.

“I’m proud that Major League Baseball can partner with Fanatics to help support the brave healthcare workers and emergency personnel who are on the front lines of helping patients with COVID-19. They’re truly heroes,” MLB president Rob Manfred said.

“We hope this effort can play a part in coming together as a community to help us through this challenging situation.”

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The first fabric used to make masks and gowns were New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies uniforms, which come complete with the pinstripes typically worn by players of those clubs.

The plant plans to make the items as long as they are needed, with the US Health and Human Services department estimating up to 3.5 million face masks will be needed.

“As the demand for masks and gowns has surged, we’re fortunate to have teamed up with Major League Baseball to find a unique way to support our frontline workers in this fight to stem the virus, who are in dire need of essential resources,” Fanatics executive chairman Michael Rubin told the MLB website.

The MLB season was supposed to have started on Thursday but has been postponed indefinitely due to the pandemic.

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