Koepka enjoys playing with a chip on the shoulder

U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka does not believe he gets the recognition he fully deserves, a fact he is fine with.

Brooks Koepka addresses the media   -  Getty Images

Brooks Koepka plans to keep channelling a perceived underdog status and playing with a chip on his shoulder in a bid to continue pushing himself to new heights.

It has been a memorable 13 months for Koepka, who backed up his maiden major win at the 2017 U.S. Open by defending his title at Shinnecock Hills last month.

Koepka took the long path to success having honed his craft on the European Tour early in his professional career before becoming a regular on the PGA Tour.

After winning his second U.S. Open, Koepka stated his belief that his talent is often overlooked but he is happy to continue flying under the radar.

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"I mean, I still feel that way," he said ahead of his bid to win The Open at Carnoustie this weekend.

"It's kind of funny. Someone told me they were laughing. I guess ESPN or something like that on their Instagram page, someone was showing it to me, the day we won, they've got like [NFL star] Odell Beckham dunking a basketball. "

"It's like, well, he should be able to. He's like 6'2". He's got hops [the ability to jump well], we all know that, and he's got [good] hands. So, what's impressive about that? But I always try to find something where I feel like I'm kind of the underdog and kind of put that little chip on my shoulder."

"Even if you're number one, you've got to find a way to keep going and keep that little chip on and try to get better and better. But I think I've done a good job of that."

"I need to continue doing that because, once you're satisfied you're only going to go downhill from there. You try to find something to get better and better and that's what I'm trying to do."

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