Aussie champion shooter's Rio hopes in limbo

Diamond, who is aiming for his seventh Olympics, was charged last month after an alleged domestic incident with his brother. He pleaded not guilty to firearms and drink-driving charges on Tuesday in a case which has left his hopes of making the Rio Games in limbo.

Diamond won trap shooting gold at the 1996 Atlanta and 2000 Sydney Olympics, and finished just outside the medals in fourth at London four years ago.   -  K. Ananthan

Australia's most decorated Olympic shooter Michael Diamond pleaded not guilty to firearms and drink-driving charges on Tuesday in a case which has left his hopes of making the Rio Games in limbo.

Diamond, who is aiming for his seventh Olympics, was charged last month after an alleged domestic incident with his brother. The 44-year-old double Olympic gold medallist fronted the Raymond Terrace Local Court, north of Sydney, where he denied the offences, including having a shotgun and 150 rounds of ammunition in his car, reports said.

His lawyer pleaded for the case to be expedited so it could be completed before the July 4 selection cut-off date for the Olympic team. The trap shooter is currently ineligible while he has criminal charges hanging over his head.

Magistrate Caleb Franklin adjourned the case until Friday to give Diamond's legal team time to estimate how long the hearing would take, but indicated he would need convincing to speed it up.

"If I'm asked to push back other people including those in custody... I'll need some persuading," Franklin said, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Diamond won trap shooting gold at the 1996 Atlanta and 2000 Sydney Olympics, and finished just outside the medals in fourth at London four years ago.

He is also a five-time Commonwealth Games gold medallist.

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