Injured Kyrgios rules out surgery as an option

Nick Kyrgios, who retired hurt from the opening match against Pierre-Hugues Herbert on Monday, said surgery would be the last option to get injured hip fixed and hoped to be back in circuit and play as many tournaments as possible in the hard courts of the United States.

Australia's Nick Kyrgios rests during his men's singles match against Pierre-Hugues Herbert of France.   -  AP

 

Nick Kyrgios, who retired hurt from the opening match against Pierre-Hugues Herbert on Monday, said surgery would be the last option to get injured hip fixed and hoped to be back in circuit and play as many tournaments as possible in the hard courts of the United States.

The World No. 20 said he wasn’t feeling a 100 per cent fit and playing against a good grass court player didn’t make things easy for him. “I just wasn't 100%. But nothing to take away from him. He plays great grass court tennis. He serves well. So he's going to do well,” Kyrgios said of the Frenchman. “I kind of knew I was in trouble. I have been feeling my hip ever since I fell over at Queen's and I never got it right. I was doing everything I could to help it, but just didn’t have enough time,” he said.

Kyrgios admitted that practicing before getting fully fit also hurt his chances. “Yeah, I mean, my preparation wasn't great. I was playing practice sets. I knew I was hurting. Then I played a couple practice matches at Boodles. I wasn't going very hard. My opponents were sort of just having a bit of fun. I knew I was going to struggle. I always had to keep my practices controlled. I wasn't moving much,”he said.

On surgery as an option to get his hip fixed, he said: “Probably not at the moment. I got too much stuff going on. Of course (on surgery not being an option). I don't think anyone wants to go down the surgery route. I had it right after Paris. I wasn't feeling it at all. When I initially got on the grass, I wasn't feeling my hip at all.”

The Australian said he will take stock of things and plan his recuperation accordingly. “I will probably get an MRI tomorrow. Hopefully get an injection or something, do rehab, and get healthy, I guess. I can't really do anything. You know, it's just a bit unlucky what happened. I mean, yeah, there's worse things in the world,” he said, revealing his desire to play in Atlanta, Washington and the subsequent tournaments in the lead up to the U.S. Open.