Murray: 'We've got more female role models than ever before'

Andy Murray, in a column for BBC writes about the significance of women in tennis and other spheres of the sporting world.

"Working with Amelie (Mauresmo) was, for me, because she was the right person for the job, and not a question of her sex at all," says Andy Murray.   -  AFP

Andy Murray, in a column for BBC, has said top-level female athletes will spur more girls to take up sports and more people championing the rights for women in sport.

The former world No. 1 has been in the news recently for his comments on gender equality in sport. During a press conference this Wimbledon, he corrected a journalist after he said Sam Querrey, who knocked the British player out of the tournament, was "the first US player to reach a Major semifinal since 2009".

"Male player," Murray interjected, trying to remind the journalist that several female players from US — notably Serena Williams — have had considerable success in Majors since 2009.

Murray, in the column, shared his experience of working with his former coach Amelie Mauresmo, a former world No. 1.

"Working with Amelie was, for me, because she was the right person for the job, and not a question of her sex at all. However, it became clear to me that she wasn't always treated the same as men in similar jobs, and so I felt I had to speak out about that."

Playing mixed doubles with Heather Watson and Laura Robson at Hopman Cup and the Olympics, Murray says, he enjoyed a lot.

"Playing mixed sport has huge benefits like making friendships, building confidence and saving money for schools and clubs," he says.

He mentions his mother's (Judy Murray, his former coach) Miss-Hits programme that teaches girls the basics of tennis.

"If more girls can see women competing at a top level," he says, "it will hopefully encourage more girls into sport across the board."

"We've got more female role models than ever before, more female commentators than ever before and more people championing the rights for women in sport than ever before."