The resurgence of kabaddi

Kabaddi had been a long forgotten sport in our country. But slowly and steadily it is gaining pace and popularity.

The Pro Kabaddi League has been instrumental in making the sport really popular.   -  R. RAGU

A game of rural India that needs minimum equipments, a game of tact and skill that also strengthens one’s body, a game played by many of us in our childhood but never given the name of ‘a sport.’

That’s KABADDI.

Kabaddi had been a long forgotten sport in our country. But slowly and steadily it is gaining pace and popularity. People are being attracted towards it. The speed of the game, the fluctuations in the score, the fitness of the players and the short duration of the matches are creating an interest among the masses for the game.

The credit for the growing popularity of this sport goes entirely to the Pro Kabaddi League. It has brought this exciting game into our living rooms and made us familiar with words like Super Raid, Super Tackle, High 5, Raider, Defender etc. Wazir Singh, Ajay Thakur, Maninder Singh, Pradeep Narwal, Surinder Nada, Manjit Chillar (to name a few) have become household names.

As the League wrapped up its Season 5, there has been an increase in the number of teams and sponsors as well. The inflow of money is beneficial for the game and its players. Being a part of the Asian Games, it has brought many laurels to Team India. It was a Demonstration Sport in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, but fans are still waiting for it to be formally included among the Olympic disciplines.

There is a strong hope in our hearts that one day this ancient rural sport of our nation will become the people’s favourite all over the world and make everyone breathless.

Support Sportstar


Dear Reader,

Support our journalism — where text and pictures intermingle so seamlessly — and help us scale up your experience as the world changes around us. Your contribution is vital to our brand of uninfluenced, boots-on-the-ground reportage that’s worth your while. Clickbait sensationalism is not for us, but editorial independence is — we owe it to you.