Top archers back strong athletes' presence in AAI

Some leading archers, who have represented the country at the highest stage, have come out in support of the Archers Commission of India (ACI), proposed by court-appointed administrator-cum-returning officer, S.Y. Quraishi, of the Archery Association of India (AAI).

Archers feel that the initiative to form ACI to make the provision for archers' representation in the AAI with voting rights, is a much-needed step to improve the governance in the National federation. (Representative image)   -  AFP

Some leading archers, who have represented the country at the highest stage, have come out in support of the Archers Commission of India (ACI), proposed by court-appointed administrator-cum-returning officer, S.Y. Quraishi, of the Archery Association of India (AAI).

According to Olympian, Satyadev Prasad, Quraishi’s initiative to form ACI to make the provision for archers' representation in the AAI with voting rights is a much-needed step to improve the governance in the National federation, which has been suspended by the Sports Ministry for the last six years due to non-compliance with the National Sports Code.

Amidst reports of strong objection to certain provisions, such as ineligibility of public servants from contesting polls and paving way for archers' representation in the executive committee, Quraishi has placed the National federation's amended constitution has been placed before the Supreme Court.

Dronacharya award winner, Purnima Mahato, also welcomed the new provision.   -  K. Murali Kumar

 

Former athletes rejected the reported objections from the officials of the AAI and the Indian Olympic Association (IOA).

“What's wrong in giving chance to archers in the executive body and give them voting rights? This will curb corruption and injustice. This is an excellent step and should be implemented in all sports,” said Satyadev, who competed in 2004 Olympics.

Sanjeeva Singh, an Arjuna and Dronachrya award winner, said, “The ACI is a good initiative. The committee of ex-archers will go a long way in bringing sportspersons to the fore and enabling them to have a say in running of their sport in the country.”

Another top archer of his times, Rajendra Guhia said, “Athletes from all sports should support this.”

Dronacharya award winner Purnima Mahato also welcomed the new provision. “The ex-athletes should get voting rights to help promote sports,” she said.

C. Lalremsanga, a two-time Olympian in the 1990s, backed the move. “It's wrong to think that IAS and political leaders can only bring money to sports. Every discipline cannot be like cricket, but it can be like kabaddi. A code of conduct and voting rights to ex-archers are moves which will help archery,” he said.