Bindra: 'Sad to see BCCI disintegrate because of one man's obsession'

Veteran sports administrator I. S. Bindra said that if Shashank Manohar returned to head the Board then the BCCI would be in a better place.

I. S. Bindra

I. S. Bindra said that the BCCI made a blunder by floating the idea that the ICC would take action against the Board citing government intervention.   -  Akhilesh Kumar

Veteran sports administrator I. S. Bindra is pained at the current state of the BCCI following the sweeping reforms recommended by the Lodha Committee.

Bindra, who worked to promote table tennis before concentrating on his work in cricket, went on to head the Board and came to be acknowledged as one of the finest administrators in Indian cricket.

"I was only a small worker. The BCCI was built brick by brick over the years by stalwarts like (MA) Chidambaram, (M) Chinnaswamy, (NKP) Salve, (S) Sriraman, (Madhavrao) Scindia. But this great institution stands destroyed because of one man's arrogance," Bindra told Sportstar.

"The seed of Board’s destruction as a sports body lay in the decision of N. Srinivasan to defy the judiciary," said Bindra, who was away to Philippines on a holiday. On returning home, he was shocked to learn of the developments that have left the Board with no leadership.

"I, along with (senior Board officials) Sanjay Jagdale and Ajay Shirke had advised Srinivasan to step down from his post of president at the AGM in Chennai (in 2013). But, we three were isolated because Srinivasan found support from five other Board officials who chose to stay back in Delhi. He stepped aside, but only aggravated the problems for the Board and is still wanting to make a back-door entry,” asserted Bindra.

Bindra was furious at the Board’s decision to challenge the judiciary. "It was an ill-advised move. You can fight the Government but not the judiciary. Their word is the law. There is a way of putting your differences across but it is silly if you think you can take on the Supreme Court. The Board should have complied with the reforms and then later approached the Court to look at the issues. I feel sad to see this great cricket institution disintegrate because of one man's obsession to hang on to power,” added Bindra.

In Bindra’s opinion, the Board made a blunder by floating the idea that the ICC would take action against the BCCI citing government intervention. “Eighty per cent of the revenue for ICC is generated from India. If the Indian Board is finished the ICC would be finished too. Do you think ICC would have taken any action? It was poor thinking," Bindra fumed.

Even as hopes have rescinded of good administration in the absence of leadership, Bindra hoped better sense would prevail in the Board.

"There is no leadership. Experience has been wiped out because of self-inflicted woes. It is time they realize their follies and work to set things right. I have little hopes though. Cricket administration will take a dip and the Board is in for some tough times ahead. If (ICC Chairman) Shashank Manohar returns to head the Board there is some hope," observed Bindra.