World Cup 2019 India vs New Zealand semifinal reserve day: All you need to know

The reserve day in World Cup 2019 will be a continuation not a restart, assuming play commenced on the original match day.

India's World Cup 2019 semifinal against New Zealand in Manchester on Tuesday is likely to be interrupted by rain, with light showers forecast for match day.   -  getty images

India's World Cup 2019 semifinal against New Zealand in Manchester on Tuesday is likely to be interrupted by rain, with light showers forecast for match day.

According to the British Met Department, reports, Tuesday will likely be a cloudy, with spells of light showers.

But unlike the group stage, the semifinals and the final have a reserve day each. But the weather forecast for Wednesday (reserve day for India vs New Zealand semifinal) doesn't look promising either with "rather extensive rain" expected to persist along with generally overcast conditions.

READ| Light showers forecast for Old Trafford on Ind vs NZ match day

When are the reserve days?

India vs New Zealand at Old Trafford – Wednesday 10th July

England vs Australia at Edgbaston – Friday 12th July

Final: at Lord’s – Monday 15th July

 

The reserve day will be a continuation not a restart, assuming play commenced on the original match day. If no play was possible on the original planned match day, a full 50-over per team match will commence on the reserve day, weather permitting. A tied match will use a super over to determine the winner.

What if no play is possible on the Reserve Day?

If after the scheduled day and reserve day the semifinal match has still not reached a result, the higher-placed team from the league stage will progress to the final.

If there is no play possible on either the originally schedule day of the final, nor the reserve day, the World Cup will be shared by the two finalist teams.

READ| Dhoni to retire after Team India's last World Cup 2019 match?

How does DLS work?

With wet weather expected to affect Tuesday's semifinal match, the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern (DLS) method could come to feature prominently.

When a match is interrupted by inclement weather, and one or both teams do not get their full quota of overs, an outcome has to be reached in the time available after resumption of play.

What any calculation is doing is trying to adjust a target score according to the reduction in overs. Any number is an estimate: there is no one right answer. What the ICC has tried to do is arrive at a formula that takes into account as many parameters as possible and properly reflects the efforts of both teams.

The DLS method, which has been updated a few times, is generally considered the most accurate system used in international cricket.