Kosgei among 11 nominees for Female World Athlete of the Year

Kenya's marathon world record holder Brigid Kosgei was one of 11 nominees for the IAAF female athlete of the year, athletics' governing body announced on Tuesday.

Kenya's Brigid Kosgei, who broke the women's marathon world record in Chicago, had clocked the fastest half-marathon in history this year at 1:04:28 as well.   -  Twitter (@iaaforg)

Kenya's marathon world record holder Brigid Kosgei was one of 11 nominees for the IAAF female athlete of the year, athletics' governing body announced on Tuesday.

The 25-year-old Kosgei finished the Chicago Marathon in two hours, 14 minutes and four seconds on Sunday to shatter Paula Radcliffe's 16-year-old world record of 2:15:25, which the Briton had set in London.

American Dalilah Muhammad, who earlier this month broke her own world record to win the women's 400 metres hurdles title at the world championships with a time of 52.16 seconds, was also nominated for the global honour.

Muhammad, 29, the 2016 Olympic champion, crossed the finish line 0.04 seconds faster than her previous world record which was set in July.

Other world champions included were Kenya's Beatrice Chepkoech (3000 metres steeplechase) and Hellen Obiri (5,000 metres), Jamaica's Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (100m and 4x100m) and Briton Katarina Johnson-Thompson (heptathlon).

Sifan Hassan, Mariya Lasitskene, Malaika Mihambo, Salwa Eid Naser and Yulimar Rojas completed the list.

A three-way voting process will determine the finalists, with fans eligible to vote online on the IAAF's social media platforms up to Nov. 5.

The male nominees were announced on Monday.

Athletes of the year will be announced at the World Athletics Awards in November.

Support Sportstar


Dear Reader,

Support our journalism — where text and pictures intermingle so seamlessly — and help us scale up your experience as the world changes around us. Your contribution is vital to our brand of uninfluenced, boots-on-the-ground reportage that’s worth your while. Clickbait sensationalism is not for us, but editorial independence is — we owe it to you.