Rafiq fears he may never work again after speaking out about racism

Azeem Rafiq, who is of Pakistani descent, told a British parliamentary committee in November about the discrimination he faced while at Yorkshire, saying the sport in England was "institutionally racist".

FILE PHOTO: Rafiq's accusations shook English sport and cost Yorkshire sponsors, with the England and Wales Cricket Board suspending the county from hosting international or major matches at Headingley.   -  AP

Former Yorkshire spinner Azeem Rafiq fears speaking out about racism in English cricket has made him unemployable.

Rafiq, who is of Pakistani descent, told a British parliamentary committee in November about the discrimination he faced while at Yorkshire, saying the sport in England was "institutionally racist".

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"I never thought it would be easy. I thought it would be a few years down the line when I felt the full force of negativity from what I'd said," Rafiq, who would like to work as a coach or in the media, told Sky Sports.

"At the age of 31 it feels like I can never be employed again. I have two kids and it worries me about the impact this might have on them."

During the parliamentary committee hearing, Rafiq said racist language was used "constantly" and was "never stamped out" as it "became the norm" while he was at Yorkshire.

Rafiq's accusations shook English sport and cost Yorkshire sponsors, with the England and Wales Cricket Board suspending the county from hosting international or major matches at Headingley.

The allegations led to a number of resignations at Yorkshire, with Kamlesh Patel taking over as chairman from Roger Hutton.

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Rafiq added that the fallout from the scandal has continued to affect him.

"When the sanctions kick in for institutions, that's when I fear the threats could be very real. Dealing with the racist abuse, speaking to Yorkshire, raising it -- was difficult, but it's not been half as bad as what's followed," he said.

He said on the backlash he has received after speaking out had left other players wary of following in his footsteps.

"If everyone had been allowed to speak out it would have been even harder and more uncomfortable for the game, but clearly there was more interest in trying to quieten people down," he said.

"As an individual it can be very hard to speak out.

"I've had people contact me saying they want to speak out and I've told them the truth of what will happen if they do, but I've also told them that they won't be on their own because I will stand alongside them."

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