World Cup 2019: Net bowler hospitalised after getting hit on head by Warner's shot

Australian team’s practice session came to a temporary halt after a net bowler of Indian origin was hit on the head by a cracking drive from David Warner on the eve of its World Cup game against India.

Jai Kishan, a net bowler, receives treatment after being hit on the head, in London on Saturday.   -  Reuters

Australian team’s practice session came to a temporary halt after a net bowler of Indian origin was hit on the head by a cracking drive from David Warner on the eve of its World Cup game against India.

It was during the end of second hour when Jai Kishan, a British fast bowler of Indian origin was hit on the head trying to stop a David Warner shot.

Jai Kishan winced in pain before collapsing to the ground and the medical staff was rushed onto the field.

To everyone’s relief, the player was responding as the entire Australian team stopped its session.

A concerned Warner sat beside the player and subsequently called off his net session.

The Australian team’s support staff along with local staff then helped him to be stretchered off the ground and was taken to a nearby medical facility.

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It is expected that he would be under observation for a minimum 24 hours since he sustained an injury on the head. "David has been a bit shaken up. It was a decent hit. I hope the youngster is okay. It’s quite unfortunate that someone gets hit like that. The medical staff did exceptional job about following the right protocols,” said Australia skipper Aaron Finch. "But, yes, Dave was pretty shaken up, no doubt. It was a decent hit to the head. Hopefully everything keeps going well for the youngster and he's back up and running shortly. Yes, it was tough to watch."

“From Surrey medical facility, he has now been taken to hospital for precautionary measures. He was conscious when he was taken to hospital. We will provide further updates when available,” ICC venue manager Michael Gibson informed the media.