Masters 2019: Tiger's major wait and McIlroy's Grand Slam bid

The 2019 Masters will be played later this week and, ahead of the action, we take a look at key facts.

Last year's Masters champion Patrick Reed.   -  Getty Images

The first major of 2019 is upon us with the Masters at Augusta National this week.

Patrick Reed won the tournament last year and excitement is building again ahead of one of golf's historic events.

Will Reed defend his title? Could Tiger Woods end his wait for a major? Can Rory McIlroy finally land the Grand Slam?

With the help of Opta, we take a look at the key facts heading into this week's action.

 

83 - The Masters is the youngest of the four majors in men's golf, with 82 previous editions. Of those, 60 have been won by Americans.

4 - At each of the past four Masters, a first-time major winner has triumphed.

14 - Woods has won more majors than any other active player. His first such success came at the Masters in 1997.

11 - Were Woods to win at Augusta, it would be his first major win since the 2008 US Open. No player has waited longer than 11 years between wins (Ben Crenshaw: 1984 Masters and 1995 Masters).

19 - Woods has made the cut in all 19 of his Masters appearances. It is the only major where he has a 100 per cent record of this nature as a professional.

3 - Only Jack Nicklaus (1965-1966), Nick Faldo (1989-1990) and Woods (2001-2002) have ever successfully defended a Masters title. Reed will hope to follow suit.

1 - Rickie Fowler finished a single stroke behind Reed last year. This will be his 37th major appearance and he has yet to win one.

11 - McIlroy heads to Augusta for his 11th crack at the Masters, looking to become golf's sixth Grand Slam winner. A Northern Irishman has never won this tournament.

10 - McIlroy has finished in the top 10 at the Masters in each of the last five years - the longest active streak of any player.

5 - Sergio Garcia won the Masters in 2017, but he has missed the cut in each of the last five majors. This is the worst run of his career.

50 - Since 2015, Jordan Spieth has been the sole leader after 50 per cent of his rounds at the Masters (eight out of 16).