South Africa keeps review as new laws come into force

Kagiso Rabada’s appeal for leg-before-wicket was turned down with DRS’s ‘umpire’s call’ verdict, but South Africa kept its review, on the third day of the first Test against Bangladesh.

South Africa lost a review with Kagiso Rabada struck Tamim Iqbal in front of the stumps. The ball was found to be missing the stumps upon review.   -  Getty Images

 

South Africa failed to overturn an umpire's decision but did not lose its review as new playing conditions came into effect on the third day of the first Test against Bangladesh at Senwes Park on Saturday.

Kagiso Rabada appealed for a leg-before-wicket decision against Tamim Iqbal in the fourth over of the day after Bangladesh, replying to South Africa's 496 for three declared, had added four runs to its overnight total of 127 for three.

Read: Elgar looks to positives after ‘anticlimactic’ innings

Umpire Bruce Oxenford turned down the appeal. South Africa asked for a review, which showed the ball was clipping the outside of leg stump - in the 'umpire's call' zone. Previously South Africa would have lost one of its two permitted reviews but under new regulations which came into effect on Thursday, it kept the review.

Second day report: South Africa on top despite Elgar heartbreak

But South Africa lost a review in Rabada's next over when a reverse-swinging yorker struck Tamim on the boot before going off his bat for a run. Again South Africa challenged Oxenford's not-out decision but although Tamim was struck in front of the stumps, the ball was swinging so sharply that it was missing the stumps - so the review was lost.

Ironically, South Africa did not ask for a review in the same over when replays showed Mominul Haque's stumps would have been hit by yet another swinging Rabada delivery.

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