More Premier League sides listed among Europe's most valuable clubs: report

There were eight Premier League clubs on last year's list, with Aston Villa and West Ham United making their debut in 2022 and joining Manchester United, Liverpool, Manchester City, Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur, Arsenal, Leicester City and Everton.

England's top flight leads the way with 10 clubs, followed by Italy's Serie A, which has seven teams among the 32. REPRESENTATIONAL IMAGE   -  GETTY IMAGES

The Premier League now has 10 teams in a list of the 32 most valuable clubs in Europe, according to a report published on Thursday by analysts Football Benchmark.

There were eight Premier League clubs on last year's list, with Aston Villa and West Ham United making their debut in 2022 and joining Manchester United, Liverpool, Manchester City, Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur, Arsenal, Leicester City and Everton.

England's top flight leads the way with 10 clubs, followed by Italy's Serie A, which has seven teams among the 32.

The report, which used annual financial statements and squad values to calculate the valuation of clubs as of Jan. 1, said the Premier League's growth was largely down to broadcast revenues.

It added that "in 2019/20, the latest season for which total league level information was available at the time of writing, the Premier League's aggregate operating revenues of 5.1 billion euros ($5.45 billion) put them comfortably at the top.

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"While Premier League clubs enjoy advantages in terms of matchday revenues to some extent and even larger benefits from their greater commercial appeal ... what really sets them apart are highly remunerative broadcasting agreements."

LaLiga champions Real Madrid were Europe's most valuable club for a fourth consecutive year with a valuation of 3.18 billion euros, followed by Manchester United (2.833 billion euros) and Barcelona (2.814 billion euros).

The report added that clubs were beginning to recover from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Last year's financial results still bear the negative impacts of COVID-19, while the past several months reflect solid signs of football returning to normal," the report's author Andrea Sartori said.

"Most notably with crowds back in stadia and with continued robust demand from sponsors and investors."

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