Clean sweep: IPL fans to band in Hyderabad to discuss plastic use in stadiums

Nearly 4 to 4.5 tonnes of waste (approximately 130 grams per spectator) is left behind in the stands after a game. Most of that is material like paper and plastic cups, spoons and forks, leftover food, tissues and flags and cheer items. About 40 per cent of that is single use plastic and poses a threat to the environment thanks to its non-biodegradable properties.

ipl fans clean up

Representatives of fans associations of six IPL franchises will converge in Hyderabad on the sidelines of Sunday's summit clash to spread awareness on on reducing use of plastics in stadiums.   -  K. Pichumani (The Hindu)

This edition of the IPL has given us some thrilling contests to watch but these aren't the only types of clean sweeps going around.

There has been a heightened sense of social responsibility this time around, with fans going the extra mile to clean up after themselves once a match is done. Ahead of the final, fans intend to take this to the next level.

Representatives of fans associations of six IPL franchises will converge in Hyderabad on the sidelines of Sunday's summit clash to spread awareness on on reducing use of plastics in stadiums.

Organised by International Institute of Waste Management (IIWM), a non-profit organisation that is supported by the European Union Resource Efficiency Initiative, the meet up will see a round table conference being held in the city, after which the 'Hyderabad Declaration' on plastic waste management at sporting venues will be signed.

READ | CSK's Yellow Army cleans stand at Chepauk after KXIP match, catches Raina's eye

“After every cricket match, about 4 to 4.5 tonnes of wastes (about 130 grams per spectator) is left behind in the stands. The stands are littered with single use material like paper and plastic cups, leftover food, packaging items like card boards, plastic and spoons, forks, tissues and most importantly flags and cheer items,” the organisation said in a release.

“About 40 percent of this waste is single use plastic material, which pose great danger to the environment as these material remain in nature without degrading for more than 100 years,” it added.

IIWM has been implementing a project called Green Wicket since 2012 which has helped in making Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bengaluru the first Green Cricket Stadium in the world. The stadium has all the four eco-infrastructure in place -- Solar PV, Rainwater Harvesting, Waste water Recycling and Biogas plant for Solid Waste Management, the IIWM said.

As an extension to the Green Wicket project, another initiative called ‘Plastic Waste Clean Bowled’ began in Bengaluru for the IPL matches with the objective of reducing the single use material and to reduce littering.

“If the spectators help in segregating the waste, this source segregation will increase the recycling capacity. It is interesting to note that the cricket matches also create entrepreneurship for recyclers,” said Bineesha P, Executive Director, IIWM.

Bineesha added that this initiative will be extended to other stadia which will host sports like football, badminton, kabbadi in the coming months.