JUICY QUOTES -- PAUL FEIN

I would say my only frustration is when . . . you try your best, give 100 percent (and) people start wanting more than that. That's when you start banging your head against the wall. _ Tim Henman, the best hope for Britain to win a Wimbledon men's title since 1936 and a four-time semifinalist, before losing to Sebastien Grosjean in the Big W quarterfinals.-I would say my only frustration is when . . . you try your best, give 100 percent (and) people start wanting more than that. That's when you start banging your head against the wall. _ Tim Henman, the best hope for Britain to win a Wimbledon men's title since 1936 and a four-time semifinalist, before losing to Sebastien Grosjean in the Big W quarterfinals.

Hewitt may not be the worst-ever Wimbledon champion but he is certainly the dumbest. He has no idea how to get out of a scrap or change his tactics to suit the conditions. He just continues to hit the ball as hard as he can. And what can be more dumb than that?

- Ted Schroeder, the 1949 Wimbledon champion.

To be No. 1 now, to me, is a phenomenal accomplishment at this age. You don't have to just play well, you have to play well and a lot, and that's not so easy for me anymore.

— Andre Agassi, playing as well as ever at 33.

I wouldn't be surprised if we're playing each other in a major final in five years.

— Ashley Harkleroad, 18, after Maria Sharapova, 16, routed her 6-2, 6-1 in the Wimbledon first round.

I'm sorry for the language that I used. We all lose it. Unfortunately, if you lose it at work, it doesn't get shown on TV. If I do, it does. I apologise.

— Greg Rusedski, apologising for the profanities he unloaded at the umpire on a disputed point during his loss to fifth-seeded Andy Roddick.

Sounds like I had some kind of record too.

— Andre Agassi, when told he had returned the fastest serve - 149 mph by Andy Roddick at the Queen's Club - ever registered.

I think European players are hungrier. I didn't have anything when I was growing up. I wasn't spoiled. I had nothing. And I worked for it.

— Jelena Dokic, the No. 11 Wimbledon seed from Serbia, on why so many European countries produce better players than Britain.

It is probably high enough. In my opinion he is punished enough. The poor guy threw the match away with a point that didn't even matter. He had to wake up this morning and read all the papers. He's punished enough for the next year.

— Boris Becker, when asked if the $2,500 fine against Greg Rusedski for using profanity in his second-round loss to Andy Roddick was enough.

To be honest, it's humorous to me. I don't see myself as that. I don't try to do it. You know, maybe some people go for it a little bit. It's not really my thing. I don't really care. I'd rather win tennis matches.

— Andy Roddick, when asked at Wimbledon if he enjoys his status as the new sex symbol of the tennis circuit.

At last they are giving me the respect I asked for. They are giving me the space to lead my life the way I want. They refused to understand my ambitions and my determination to become a top tennis player. They could not understand the time and dedication it takes and they hurt me very much.

— Justine Henin-Hardenne, telling The Times (UK) that she is happy that her father, who refused to accept her boyfriend, didn't come to the French Open final and hasn't contacted her since her Roland Garros triumph.

When I come into a tournament I expect to win — that's my philosophy. It is no good thinking you are going to get your ass kicked and so you might as well go home. I've worked hard with my father and a tough coach and I know one day it will pay off, like wow. But, yes, I am a bit surprised to be this far.

— Maria Sharapova, after upsetting 11th-seeded Jelena Dokic 6-4, 6-4 to reach the fourth round at Wimbledon.

Go to see a monk, try to keep it calm. This is really great. Sitting down, meditation for 5, 10 minutes, you know, keep it quiet. You know, just make it easy.

— Paradorn Srichaphan, who consulted a Buddhist monk at a temple in Wimbledon village every other day during his run to the round of 16.

The things you thought you wanted, you don't. It's just material stuff that doesn't make you any happier. You have your third operation, your ranking goes down and those people you thought were your friends are no longer around.

— Mark Philippoussis, who came back from three knee operations in 14 months to reach the Wimbledon final.

Just like Lleyton, the guy's No.1 in the world two years in a row, he loses a match, everyone is on his case like he should drop his parents, that's ridiculous. I felt bad for him. I just want him to keep his head up. Everyone loves you when you're winning. You lose a match and no-one jumps on the bandwagon.

— Mark Philippoussis, rejecting criticism from former Wimbledon champions Boris Becker, Pat Cash and Ashley Cooper who contend slumping Lleyton Hewitt's parents, who travel to almost every tournament with the 22-year-old, should take a step back.

In which other sport would a 22-year-old No.1 have his parents travelling with him?

— Boris Becker, critical of Lleyton Hewitt.

Why it becomes an issue now is beyond me. It says a lot about the fickle nature and jealousy of some people. It's at times like these when you find out who your true friends are.

— Glynn Hewitt, father of deposed Wimbledon champion Lleyton, saying he and his wife found it strange there was no criticism of their presence when their son won Wimbledon last season.

If he goes out on court and is effervescent and boisterous, he gets bagged. If he goes out and is not effervescent and boisterous, he gets bagged. So how can he win? He's always copped a lot of flak, so we're used to it now.

— Glynn Hewitt, contending that his son Lleyton "never gets a fair shake" from the media.

You know, I couldn't even pick him out of a one-man lineup.

— Brad Gilbert, Andy Roddick's new coach, on just how unknown 6'7"

Alexander Popp, the surprise Wimbledon quarterfinalist, was to him.

Compared to what I used to do off the court, I think my dad and my agents and my mum are very happy I'm surfing. It's a lot safer than what I'm used to doing.

— Mark Philippoussis, who moved to San Diego a year ago and surfs up to four hours a day there.

Some of the decisions I witnessed in the past six days at Wimbledon have been nothing short of appalling and have convinced me that the time has come for technology to take over. It would not be feasible to do away with the human element in the umpire's chair, but the powers that be must take advantage of a tool like Hawkeye. Players want to be reassured that line calls are correct, and we all know there is an element of human error.

— 1987 Wimbledon champion Pat Cash.

I think the European players are much more hungry. I didn't have anything when I was growing up. I had nothing and I worked for it - it (tennis) was the only thing on my mind.

— Jelena Dokic.

My father, all his life, pays for everything for me. Coaching, tournaments, court time. It's too hard. At home, I can't get sponsorships, I have to travel on my own. You think I get $1 from the Russian federation? If you're not from Moscow, forget about it. They didn't help me at all. I get nothing.

— Svetlana Kuznetsova, who was born in St. Petersburg but moved to Barcelona, Spain, in search of better coaching and cheaper facilities.

I think right now the women's game is super exciting. We're on a different level than everybody else. I don't think we should change a thing.

— World No. 1 Serena Williams, rejecting the idea that racquet technology has injured the women's game.