Rahul Aware sees Games postponement as an opportunity

World championships medal winning wrestler Rahul Aware feels the postponement of the Olympics has come as a godsend opportunity for him.

Rahul Aware at the Maharashtra Police Academy in Nasik.   -  Special Arrangement

World championships medal winning wrestler Rahul Aware feels the postponement of the Olympics has come as a godsend opportunity for him.

Aware, who claimed a gold medal in 57kg in the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games and a bronze medal in 61kg in the World championships in Nur-Sultan last year, saw the possibility of him returning to 57kg to stake claim for the Olympic quota place.

“The World championships (where Ravi Dahiya bagged the quota place in 57kg) happened in September last year. Now, there is a huge gap between the qualifying event and the Olympics. There is no guarantee that the wrestler who got India the slot would be in good form in future.

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“I think the Wrestling Federation of India (WFI) will go for selection trials. In such a scenario, I will give my 100 per cent,” Aware, also a two-time Asian championships medallist, told Sportstar.

Aware, who is undergoing training at the Maharashtra Police Academy in Nasik after being recruited as a Deputy Superintendent of Police, is keeping fit during the lockdown.

“I used to go out into the city and train in a (wrestling) club. I had a couple of sparring partners there. After the lockdown, I am not able to leave the campus and training on my own. Once the lockdown gets over, I will resume my normal training.”

For 28-year-old Aware, life is hectic in Nasik. “Our online classes are going on. I prepare and attend those classes, complete assignments, study 30 to 40 books on law and other related topics and do my daily training. I hardly get any time.”

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On the occasion of Mother's Day, Aware fondly remembered his mother (Sharda), who stays in his village in Patoda.

“My mother never used to hide my mistakes from my father (Balasaheb), who was a top wrestler and a strict coach. She used to report if I went to play cricket or did not have proper diet. Because of their guidance, I could achieve something.

“Now, my colleagues here in the academy are like my family members. They respect me for what I have achieved,” said Aware.

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