Kohli ball tampering: No case against Indian skipper

Allegations of ball tampering against Indian Test skipper Virat Kohli stands nullified as ICC clauses states that the opposition team must report against the rival team or its player within five days of the completion of the Test match.

Footages from the first Test indicates Virat Kohli putting his right hand towards his mouth and then appeared to shine one side of the ball.   -  Screengrab

Ball tampering allegations against Team India's Test captain, Virat Kohli, by a British tabloid does not hold much ground according to clauses in the ICC's Rules and Regulations about playing conditions. On Tuesday, a British tabloid, indicated that Kohli appeared to shine the ball using residue from a sweet during the first Test in Rajkot.

Footages from the first Test indicates Kohli putting his right hand towards his mouth and then appeared to shine one side of the ball. However, there has been no complaint filed by England and they declined to comment on the issue.





As per ICC regulations on ball tampering, if a team wants to lodge a complaint about ball tampering by a rival team or its player, it has to be done within five days of the completion of the Test match.

According to ICC's 3.2.2.1 a Level 1 Offence or a Level 2 Offence that is alleged to have been committed at any time or place (whether on the field of play or otherwise), then the report must be lodged with the Match Referee (or, where, for logistical reasons, it is impractical to lodge with the Match Referee, the ICC's Cricket Operations Department) within five (5) days of the commission of the alleged offence.

The match in question is the Rajkot Test which ended on November 13 and if England team had any complaints, they needed to make it official by November 18.

All the ICC clauses, thus, put to rest media reports surrounding the incident.

This comes after Faf du Plessis was found guilty of ball tampering during the second Test. The Proteas' stand-in captain was charged with "applying saliva and residue from a mint or sweet, an artificial substance, to the ball in an attempt to change its condition" following South Africa's second Test victory in Hobart.

Du Plessis, however, pleaded not guilty to the charge, but following a hearing before Andy Pycroft of the Elite Panel of ICC Match Referees he was deemed to have broken Article 22.9 of the ICC Code of Conduct.