WFI keen on Pro Wrestling League restart post COVID-19

The PWL saw four editions before hitting a roadblock due to differences – resulting in a court case – between its promoter Pro Sportify and the WFI.

India wrestler Sakshi Malik in action at the Pro Wrestling League in 2018.   -  FILE PHOTO/PTI

The Wrestling Federation of India (WFI) is waiting for the pandemic to subside to put the Pro Wrestling League (PWL) back on track.

Since its inception in 2015, the PWL saw four editions before hitting a roadblock due to differences – resulting in a court case – between its promoter Pro Sportify and the WFI.

Following negotiations between the two sides, the promoter withdrew the case and paved the way for re-staging the league. However, the coronavirus outbreak spoilt the plan.

READ| Wrestler Rahul Aware tests positive for COVID-19

Now all the stakeholders are waiting for COVID-19 to subside. “The roadblock was cleared after they withdrew the case. But we cannot hold it in the current situation. Once things become normal, we will think of scheduling it,” said a WFI official.

A couple of franchise owners are hopeful that the PWL will be held towards the end of December or early next year.

The new edition of the PWL will welcome a new franchise, which has teams in two other leagues.

National camp

Notwithstanding the four COVID positive cases – Rahul Aware (57kg), Navin (65kg), Deepak Punia (86kg) and Krishan (125kg) – the national camp for elite men wrestlers at the Sports Authority of India (SAI) centre, Sonepat, will go on.

READ| Deepak Punia discharged from hospital, advised home isolation

“The virus has come from outside. There is no problem with the SAI centre. Training will begin in the camp shortly,” said a source.

A meeting will be held next week to deliberate about the elite women’s camp.

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