World Athletics freezes Russia panels because of unpaid fine

The Russian track federation owes a $5 million fine and another $1.31 million in costs for various doping-related work and legal wrangles.

World Athletics said RusAF missed Wednesday’s deadline to pay.   -  REUTERS

The program allowing Russian track athletes to compete internationally will be frozen because the country’s federation failed to pay a fine on time, World Athletics said Thursday.

The Russian track federation, known as RusAF, owes a $5 million fine and another $1.31 million in costs for various doping-related work and legal wrangles. World Athletics said RusAF missed Wednesday’s deadline to pay.

World Athletics said it would freeze the work of the Doping Review Board, which vets Russian athletes who want the authorized neutral athlete status that allows them to compete internationally, and its taskforce monitoring RusAF’s anti-doping reforms.

World Athletics said both bodies will be put on hold until its council meets to discuss the situation at the end of July.

READ| World Athletics fines Russia $10m, caps neutral Russian athletes at 10

RusAF is letting its athletes down badly,” World Athletics president Sebastian Coe said in a statement.

“We have done as much as we can to expedite our ANA process and support RusAF with its reinstatement plan, but seemingly to no avail.”

RusAF president Yevgeny Yurchenko earlier told the Tass state news agency that his federation’s finances were damaged by the coronavirus pandemic and that it had asked for more time to pay.

World Athletics’ statement didn’t directly address that issue, but said Russia hadn’t indicated when it would pay.

RELATED| CAS sets November dates to hear Russian doping case

Russia was fined $10 million by World Athletics in March, with $5 million suspended for two years, after the federation admitted to breaking anti-doping rules and obstructing an investigation.

The Athletics Integrity Unit said fake documents were used under the previous management to give an athlete an alibi for missing a doping test.

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