Tickle your tastebuds in Tokyo: The Japanese secret to long life

You’ve certainly heard how tasty and healthful Japanese food is – the secret to the Japanese people living longer than the rest of the world. In a day or simply a meal, a healthy Japanese diet can comprise modest servings of more than 15 different foods.

Miso contains a lot of helpful probiotics, or beneficial bacteria, because it’s a cultured food. It also has a high protein content, reduces cholesterol and boosts immunity.

I always advise my athletes to carry their own food and equipment. The best practice is to interact with the same kind of foods that you were consuming while training and practising. Trying with new cuisines without proper guidance can sometimes prove to be detrimental to an athlete’s performance.

That said, you’ve certainly heard how tasty and healthful Japanese food is – the secret to the Japanese people living longer than the rest of the world.

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According to research, the average Japanese life expectancy is over 80 years, and Japanese people have the world’s lowest obesity rate. In a day or simply a meal, a healthy Japanese diet may comprise modest servings of more than 15 different foods. Noodles, fish, legumes, shellfish and meat may be included, along with a small amount of rice and vegetables. Athletes while travelling for the Olympics can look to add the following dishes to their diet. Please keep in mind that some of these recipes may not appeal to you because they need an acquired taste, but they are worth trying for their incredible health advantages.

Miso soup

This is a popular opening dish that can be found in every Japanese restaurant and is excellent in both nutrition and taste. Miso is fermented soybean paste, and there are more than 1,000 different kinds – each different in texture, taste and flavour. Clams, green onions, potatoes, cabbage, spinach and tofu are frequently used in miso. Miso contains a lot of helpful probiotics, or beneficial bacteria, because it’s a cultured food.

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It also has a high protein content, reduces cholesterol and boosts immunity. Depending on the type of paste used, the flavour might range from salty to somewhat sweet. Miso that is light or white in colour is often sweeter than miso that is red or brown.

Matcha green tea

Green tea has many health advantages, but matcha green tea has even more. Matcha green tea uses the full tea leaf, which results in a higher concentration of antioxidants.

Shiitake mushrooms

 

Shiitake mushrooms

Shiitake mushrooms are high in protein and low in fat and calories, making them an excellent meat alternative for vegetarian or vegan recipes. They’ve also been shown to possess nutrients that help prevent cholesterol build-up and heart disease.

Sushi

Sushi is frequently regarded as an art form because of its meticulous preparation and accuracy. Due to its global appeal, sushi is also one of the most well-known Japanese foods. It is usually made out of vegetables, fish, seaweed or vinegared rice. If the notion of eating raw fish does not appeal to you, try sushi with cooked fish, seafood, veggies or fruits instead. Please keep in mind that sushi may be as healthful or as gluten-laden as you like; it all boils down to your choices.

Sashimi.

 

Sashimi

Sashimi is often confused with sushi, but sashimi is considerably healthier as it does not have rice. Sashimi often consists of thin slices of raw fish that are high in protein, omega-3 fatty acids and various other nutrients. Sashimi is best eaten by dipping each piece in a tiny bowl of soy sauce and eating it all at once.

Natto

If you go to a traditional Japanese restaurant, you will almost certainly find natto on the menu. To mask the odour, natto is usually served over cooked rice and topped with chives, soy sauce and mustard. Despite its unappealing appearance, it is frequently referred to as a Japanese superfood. Natto is high in minerals and other nutrients, and helps to build bones and stimulate the immune system.

Yakitori.

 

Yakitori

Yakitori is prepared by skewering pork or chicken with kushi, a sort of skewer made of steel, bamboo or other similar materials. The meat is roasted over a charcoal fire, while a healthier version is prepared using chicken breast.

Teishoku

Teishoku is a traditional Japanese set dinner that consists of a main dish (typically fish, though tempura, karaage or tonkotsu are other options), a bowl of rice, miso soup and one or two side dishes. A diversified, healthy Japanese diet is a cornerstone to excellent bodily balance, and these little amounts deliver nutrients from all food categories in one sitting.

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Onigiri

Onigiri (Japanese rice balls) is a popular and satisfying snack that is so basic that you can change them up with any ingredients you like. Tuna or pickled plum are traditional fillings, served with a seaweed wrap.

Gyoza

These are delicious Japanese dumplings filled with meat and vegetables. Gyoza is normally available in three styles – pan-fried, boiling and deep-fried.

Gyoza.

 

This is the first in a two-part series.

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