‘Big Three’ power set to be diminished at ICC

In a declared endeavour to improve transparency in the governance of cricket, the International Cricket Council (ICC) has announced a host of reforms and changes, beginning with terms aimed at preserving ‘independence’ of the ICC Chairman, and the reconstitution of the world body.

Shashank Manohar: "No member of the ICC is bigger than the other."   -  Vivek Bendre

In a declared endeavour to improve transparency in the governance of cricket, the International Cricket Council (ICC) has announced a host of reforms and changes, beginning with terms aimed at preserving ‘independence’ of the ICC Chairman, and the reconstitution of the world body.

A new Chairman is to be elected by a ‘secret balloting process overseen by the ICC’s independent Audit committee chairman’, and will hold his post for two years beginning June, 2016. During his term, he will not be allowed to be associated with any ICC Member board.

The ICC, in its statement, also mentioned its decision to review changes in the body agreed to in 2014, which essentially concentrated power into the hands of three Member boards: the BCCI, Cricket Australia, and the England and Wales Cricket Board. Their permanent position in the Executive Committee and the Finance and Commercial Affairs Committee has been agreed to be revoked.

Instead, the ICC wants to provide “fair access to membership for all Full and Associate Member directors, with the sole criteria being the skill, competence and experience of the relevant director.”





Full Members will be required to, henceforth, submit audited statements to the ICC on an annual basis.

There are various subject matters concerning cricket that have been enlisted by the ICC as having been ‘discussed’. Among the decisions taken by the world body regarding these discussed issues are the formation of an Anti-Corruption Oversight Group, the qualification process for future ICC Under-19 World Cups, and the restoring of the full membership of Sri Lanka Cricket.

The Anti-Corruption Oversight Group, consisting of Rahul Dravid, among others, will meet once a year to discuss anti-corruption efforts and to provide ‘independent input’.





Other issues in immediate consideration by the ICC are the scheduling and structure of international and domestic cricket, the idea of including cricket in Olympics or Commonwealth Games, and preparations for the ICC World Twenty20 in India (which have been indicated satisfactory), and USA’s cricket.

The present ICC Chairman, Shashank Manohar, spoke of the underlying consideration behind the changes. "The decisions taken clearly reflect that we collectively want to improve the governance in a transparent manner, not only of the ICC but also the Member Boards. This, in turn, will enhance the image and quality of the sport. No Member of the ICC is bigger than the other and I am determined to make a meaningful contribution in this regard with support of all the Members.”

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