WI v ENG: World Cup spot at stake for host

West Indies faces England in a three-match one-day series starting Friday under pressure to reverse a run of poor form that could see it facing the indignity of having to qualify for the World Cup in 2019.

Newly-installed West Indies coach Stuart Law said making the 2019 World Cup was crucial.

 

West Indies faces England in a three-match one-day series starting Friday under pressure to reverse a run of poor form that could see it facing the indignity of having to qualify for the World Cup in 2019.

The top eight teams in the ICC ODI rankings at the end of September 2017 automatically advance to the event in England.

The West Indies -- struggling in ninth spot, three points behind Pakistan and a further two adrift of Bangladesh -- has only this series, a return duel in England in September and, critically, three matches against Pakistan in the Caribbean in April to make the cut.

England has no such concerns as host of both the World Cup and the next Champions Trophy in June, for which the West Indies failed to qualify.

England's brand of ultra-aggressive limited-over cricket since the disappointment of the 2105 World Cup, where it failed to get past the group stage, makes it favourite to extend its domination of the home team.

Newly-installed West Indies coach Stuart Law said making the 2019 World Cup was crucial.

"The main aim is to qualify for the next World Cup so these one-day games are extremely important to us," said the Australian.

"So that's our main focus really at this stage. I know we have Pakistan coming for T20s, Tests and one-dayers as well but the one-day series probably will take paramount importance."

West Indies' last victory in a head-to-head series was in 2007 in England under the leadership of Chris Gayle, one of several prominent players now ruled ineligible for regional representative duty due to commitments to lucrative T20 franchise tournaments around the world.

- 'Challenging' -

Both teams are coming off series losses, the West Indies failing to advance to the final of a three-nation tournament in Zimbabwe last November that also involved Sri Lanka, and England falling to India in January after being thrashed in the preceding Test series at the end of 2016.

"The wickets will be a little bit more challenging here than in India," said England skipper Eoin Morgan.

"The wickets there were batter-friendly, a lot more so than we thought they were going to be."

Notwithstanding the favourites’ tag, the English will also be wary of the conditions as well as the opposition following contrasting victories in two warm-up matches against what was effectively a West Indies second-string outfit in St. Kitts.

While most of the frontline batsmen were able to get decent scores in a commanding performance on Saturday, they laboured on the same pitch at Warner Park two days later, eking out a two-wicket win after the middle-order stuttered against the spinners.

Spin reliant?

With the surface at the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium in North Sound expected to be of a similar nature, West Indies is likely to play both frontline slow bowlers, Devendra Bishoo and Ashley Nurse.

England, which has summoned Tom Curran from the Lions tour of Sri Lanka to replace fast-medium bowler Jake Ball, is likely to counter with Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid seeking to exploit a dry, wearing pitch.

West Indies cricket's ongoing disputes involving premier players continues as batsman Dwayne Bravo, who publicly disparaged West Indies Cricket Board president Dave Cameron via Twitter last November and was subsequently withdrawn from the tour of Zimbabwe, is not being considered for selection until he submits a formal apology.

The first two matches of the series will take place at North Sound, Antigua on Friday and Sunday before switching to Barbados on March 9.

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