Weightlifting could lose Olympics spot due to corruption, warns IOC

The IOC said weightlifting could lose its place in future Olympic Games if the investigations into the sports' global federation reveal more corruption.

Weightlifting

The recent investigations into the into the International Weightlifting Federation uncovered $10.4 million of unaccounted money, vote-buying and evidence of close to 40 positive doping cases being covered up. (Representational Image)   -  GETTY IMAGES

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) on Wednesday said that weightlifting could lose its place in future Olympic Games if the investigations into the sports' international federation reveal more corruption.

Earlier this month, an investigation into the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) found widespread corruption and dozens of covered up drugs tests.

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Lead investigator Richard McLaren said the probe into the body's affairs, under former president Tamas Ajan, uncovered $10.4 million of unaccounted money, vote-buying and evidence of close to 40 positive doping cases being covered up.

“We are deeply concerned and shocked by this report and the scope of these activities being reflected in this report with regard to anti-doping and governance,” IOC president Thomas Bach said in a teleconference.

“We made it very clear depending on the results of the findings of the IWF oversight commission, we reserve the right for very far-reaching measures including but not limited to the question of weightlifting being on the programme of the Olympic Games.”

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“What we can say now is we will fully support the new leadership of IWF... to reform the governance of the federation and also in efforts to make the anti-doping system fully independent from the federation. The major steps have been done.”

Bach also added that the IOC accreditation for next year's Tokyo Olympics will not be granted to any IWF official implicated by the ongoing inquiry.

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