Brett Lee: No offer to be India’s bowling coach yet

Asked if Team India needed a foreign coach, he was again diplomatic. "There is home-grown talent available but assets from abroad can also be tried," he said.

Former Australia fast bowler Brett Lee and Director of F45 India Pradeep Palli at the launch of Functional - 'F45' Training studio, in Hyderabad, on Monday.   -  Mohammed Yousuf

Brett Lee chose to play it safe when asked if he wished to be India’s bowling coach. “I will think about it if I am offered the position. But first let the offer come,” said the Aussie tearaway on the sidelines of a function where he was announced as brand ambassador for F45, an Australian brand of functional fitness training.

> BCCI invites application for coach’s post

Asked if Team India needed a foreign coach, he was again diplomatic. “There is home-grown talent available but assets from abroad can also be tried,” he said. On pace bowling in India, the part-time musician and movie actor said, “In a country of 1.3 billion people, a really quick bowler is still to be found. The peak some pacemen have touched is about 140 kmph.”

Endorsing the 45-minute, 27 station routine, he said the regimen worked well in a controlled environment and was not about putting on bulky muscle. “This routine does not discriminate against anybody and can be used by all, regardless of age or gender,” he said.

Bowlers were getting the wrong training and were putting on weight, which adversely affected their craft, he said. Fast bowling called for lean muscle mass, he said pointing to himself, still slim and trim. Some of the big names associated with the scheme include Hollywood stars Hugh Jackman and Nicole Kidman. On the efficacy of ice baths, gaining popularity among cricketers and athletes, he didn’t seemed convinced, contending that he limited use of frozen water to his drinks alone.

F45 India Director Pradeep Palli advocated the programme for India particularly because of widespread prevalence of type II diabetes. Its high intensity, interval training (HIIT) workouts used no machines, was a little brutal but quite addictive, he concluded.